| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter

News

2754 Articles | Page: | Show All

Branch aims to reinvent social media with new app

When the team developing startup Branch decided it wanted to work in software, it didn't just try to create the next best thing in social media. The six young people from Ann Arbor are trying to reinvent the entire sector.

"We started from the ground up," says Ryan Wolande, co-founder & CEO of Branch. "We scrapped what we had been conditioned to from other social media outlets."

Branch is a mobile app that is meant to turn people's digital presence into a real-world interaction. The software finds individuals who share the same interests and are in close proximity to each other and connects them.

"It's about fostering real-world relationships," Wolande says. "It's about social media in the physical world."

The Ann Arbor-based startup and its team of six people is in the homestretch of developing the software platform. Branch plans to start Beta testing soon and make the technology public later this fall.

Source: Ryan Wolande, co-founder & CEO of Branch
Writer: Jon Zemke

iVantage moves into bigger office to accommodate revenue growth

The iVantage Group is in the midst of some big changes and the Brighton-based staffing firm has a lot of growth to show for it.

The 10-year-old company specializes in staffing services for the IT, insurance and banking sectors. It helps its clients find IT, engineering, finance and executive talent in the tech world. The iVantage Group is in the midst of moving to a new home in Brighton, which is triple the size of its former space. The 4,500-square-foot office has room for better training and space for its current staff to stretch out.

"It's an amazing space in so many ways," says Juliet Shrader, president & CEO of iVantage Group. "We are growing so fast we were bursting at the seams."

The iVantage Group employs 12 people at its headquarters and another 100 in the field. It has hired four recruiters over the last year and is in the process of adding two more. That employee growth comes after several years of double-digit revenue gains, the smallest of which was 18 percent.

The firm also recently reorganized its leadership structure, adding more management positions. The idea is to help bring more leaders in to help grow the company, which has paid off handsomely so far.

"We now have a recruiter lead," Shrader says. "We never had that before. Creating that position has made our team not only bigger but stronger."

Source: Juliet Shrader, president & CEO of iVantage Group
Writer: Jon Zemke

Incite Informatics adds 5 jobs as revenue spikes

Culture isn't just a catchphrase for Incite Informatics. It's something worth hiring people for.

The Farmington-based company, formerly Performant Systems Group, has all the requisites for a new tech firm, like an office full of smart young people working in comfortable jobs and periodically playing ping pong to boost productivity. It even hired a culture curator to help sharpen the company’s culture.

"Culture has always been important to us," says Matt Griffin, president & CEO of Incite Informatics. "We have always hired young people. People who have different expectations about what the workplace looks like and acts like."

Griffin and Craig Jackson launched the company four years ago, specializing in business analysis, analytics tools, data management and data visualization. They rebranded it earlier this month to better reflect the company's ability to organize, visualize, and mobilize their clients' data, giving them better visibility into operations so they can make better decisions.

"We grew up building solutions for large companies like KFC and Ingersoll-Rand," Griffin says. "But we're also working with a number of small companies."

Incite Informatics opened a new office in Seattle earlier this year. It has hired five people over the last year and is looking to bring on another three. It currently has a staff 21 employees and two interns. Its revenue spiked over the last year, going from $1.8 million to $4.8 million.

"It's a healthy jump," Griffin says. "I don't know how sustainable it is year to year but we're definitely in growth mode."

Source: Matt Griffin, president & CEO of Incite Informatics
Writer: Jon Zemke

Midtown Concierge opens pilot site in Henry Ford Hospital

Balance Concierge expanded into Detroit with the opening of Midtown Concierge earlier this month.

The East Lansing-based firm specializes in providing concierge services at hospitals. It launched a pilot location in Henry Ford Hospital in New Center called Midtown Concierge. The year-long pilot will offer free concierge services to Henry Ford Health System employees, helping them strike a better work-life balance by taking care of everyday tasks, such as oil changes and getting tickets to events.

Midtown Concierge is staffed by two people and is only available to hospital employees during the pilot phase.

"It has the potential to serve clients outside of the hospital after the pilot phase," says Jennifer Cooper, vice president of marketing & new programs for Balance Concierge.

Balance Concierge came to Detroit on the invitation of Henry Ford Health System. The move was facilitated by Midtown Detroit.

"They were a key player in setting this up," Cooper says.

Source: Jennifer Cooper, vice president of marketing & new programs for Balance Concierge
Writer: Jon Zemke

Brazilian immigrants launch pastry biz, Doce Brigadeiro

A couple of Brazilian immigrants are making a go of it in entrepreneurship, launching their own pastry business with the help of the Blackstone LaunchPad at Walsh College.

Doce Brigadeiro specializes in Brazilian handmade gourmet sweets. The main pastry is the popular treat called a brigadeiro. The main ingredients consist of condensed milk, cream and chocolate. Twenty-one flavors are on offer, including mint, toffee, lemon zest and sea salt caramel, as well as milk, dark and white chocolate.

"I love to do Brazilian desserts," says Danielle Cecconi, co-founder of Doce Brigadeiro. "It's something I would do every month."

Cecconi recently received her MBA from Walsh College where she leveraged the services of the Blackstone LaunchPad program, which teaches the basics of business to aspiring entrepreneurs. Cecconi and her friend, Marina Kapordelis, started selling brigadeiros to friends and family under the Doce Brigadeiro brand this spring.

The Royal Oak-based business is now looking for its own kitchen space to make its sweets, and eventually wants to open up a storefront in a local downtown like Ann Arbor or Birmingham in the not-too-distant future.

"We're hoping to get a lot of Christmas orders this year," Cecconi says.

Source: Danielle Cecconi, co-founder of Doce Brigadeiro
Writer: Jon Zemke

Creative Breakthroughs hires 23, looks for new office

Creative Breakthroughs is in the process of helping to fill a number of jobs lately. The Troy-based IT risk management company has hired a couple of dozen people over the last year and is looking to fill another few dozen at a job fair early next month.

"We built a foundation for rapid growth," says Patrick Boyd, executive vice president of marketing for Creative Breakthroughs. "We are investing in systems and business relationships with our partners and expanding our base of partners."

The 23-year-old company has hired 23 people for IT positions in consulting, engineering and sales. it currently has a staff of 75 employees and a couple of summer interns. That growth has prompted the company to add temporary space and begin looking for a bigger home in Metro Detroit.

"We need more space," Boyd says.

Creative Breakthroughs will also host a career fair at its Troy headquarters (2075 W Big Beaver Road, Suite 700) on Sept. 3 between 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. The company is looking to fill about 20 positions. It expects to eliminate the process of submitting a resume and hoping for an interview by meeting with each potential candidate and giving them an objective assessment on where their career can go.

"We plan to spend some time with everybody," Boyd says.

Source: Patrick Boyd, executive vice president of marketing for Creative Breakthroughs
Writer: Jon Zemke

RBD Creative moves to larger office in Plymouth

For RBD Creative’s first seven years, it called the carriage house of one of Detroit's oldest structures home. Today the company has matured to a traditional office in a new home in the suburbs.

The marketing company made the move to Plymouth in March. The new home puts it closer to core clients, such as the University of Michigan and Genesis Genetics, which is also based in Plymouth.

"That's part of the reason we moved to Plymouth," says Dorothy Twinney, president & owner of RBD Creative.

Also necessitating the move is RBD Creative's growth making it into a different and bigger company. When it launched it had three people. Today it has a staff of a dozen employees and the occasional intern after making two hires over the last year. The new office in Plymouth is much bigger, measuring out to 2,000 square feet. It also has a conference room.

"Now we have a much bigger conference area," Twinney says.

RBD Creative is looking to add more clients in the food and academic sectors both this year and next.

"For whatever reason these two areas seem to be our thing," Twinney says.

Source: Dorothy Twinney, president & owner of RBD Creative
Writer: Jon Zemke

Qstride continues to hire, grow in downtown Detroit

Qstride at an interesting point on its growth curve. The tech company is successful, landing large customers and spiking its revenue; however, the company doesn’t have the resources it needs to scale itself.

Qstride, which has offices in Troy and downtown Detroit, has grown its revenue by 130 percent over the last year. It now clocks sales in excess of $2 million -- something it has achieved entirely through bootstrapping.

"We have a model that is proven," says Shane Gianino, founder & CEO of Qstride. "Of course, it's a marathon, not a sprint."

The 2.5-year-old firm specializes in business intelligence and analytics services that integrate with its customer's IT systems. It also provided staffing services for the technology sector. It currently employs 20-odd people, half of whom work in downtown Detroit.

"We're looking at potentially expanding our presence downtown," Gianino says. "We're trying to figure that out."

Qstride has hired three people three people in downtown Detroit and Gianino is optimistic that the number can grow quickly over the next year as he begins to entertain offers for venture capital investment in the company to help scale it.

"We have an opportunity to add a lot of jobs in Detroit," Gianino says.

Source: Shane Gianino, founder & CEO of Qstride
Writer: Jon Zemke

LevelEleven scores $2 million more in venture capital

LevelEleven is adding a couple more million dollars to its pile of venture capital cash in downtown Detroit.

The nearly 2-year-old tech startup has landed an extra $2 million from its original investors, bringing the total amount of seed capital it's raised to $5.6 million. The $2 million is part of a convertible note that will be part of its Series A round, which the company expects to close later this year. The money will be put toward research & development of the firm’s app, sales and marketing efforts, and growing the staff.

"We're going to be investing it in all fronts," says Bob Marsh, CEO of LevelEleven. "It's really for everything."

LevelEleven spun out of HelloWorld (formerly Ferndale-based ePrize) in 2012. LevelEleven sells an enterprise gamification app (native to the salesforce platform) that helps motivate sales professionals and tracks their progress.

It currently has 175 customers, which is up from just under 100 a year ago. Some of those customers include Comcast, eBay, Tiffany & Co, Forrester, Cardinal Health, the Detroit Pistons, Shutterstock, and Microstrategy.

"It ranges from large enterprises like Comcast and eBay to small businesses," Marsh says.

LevelEleven has also hired 18 people over the last year. It currently has a staff of 26 employees and two interns. It is currently looking to hire two more people and plans to bring one of its interns (a University of Michigan student) on as a full-time employees after that person graduates next semester.

"We are literally always hiring for sales and engineering positions," Marsh says. "Anytime we can find good people we hire them."

Source: Bob Marsh, CEO of LevelEleven
Writer: Jon Zemke

Capture Caddie develops technology to analyze golf swing

Lots of people play golf and nearly as many struggle to improve their swing. A new startup based in Canton believes it has come up with technology to help them.

Capture Caddie is developing technology that creates a simple way to record a player's golf swing. The four-person team behind the 1-year-old startup notes the only way to currently capture a player's golf swing and analyze it is to hire a pro, have a friend record it on a mobile device, or set up a tripod and hit record. All of these options tend to be either clumsy or not cost-effective.

"There is just no easy way to do it," says Edward Thai, co-founder & manager of Capture Caddie. "So we made an easy-to-use kiosk."

Capture Caddie provides a kiosk at golf courses that records a players swing and sends that video to the player's computer or mobile device. The kiosk also tracts data, such as carry distance and ball flight. Check out a video on it here.

"It's data most people can't get unless they go through a pro," Thai says.

Capture Caddie is nearly done with the development of this technology and is working to demo it at some local golf courses. It is also working to gamify the technology to add a competitive element between users.

"It makes you hit shots under pressure," Thai says. "That's golf."

Source: Edward Thai, co-founder & manager of Capture Caddie
Writer: Jon Zemke

Everist Health manufactures in Michigan, organizing clinical trial

Everist Health, formerly Everist Genomics, is starting to hit its stride in sales of its cardiac-testing technology.

The Ann Arbor-based firm makes AngioDefender, which helps doctors measure the risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease. To put it simply, AngioDefender gives people medical information about their heart in an easy-to-understand way without the technical jargon. It will tell the user how old the heart is compared to its actual age. Check out a video on it here.

"You may be 45 but your heart age might be 55," says Randal Charlton, director of Everist Health.

Everist Health has hired six people around the world over the last year, bringing its staff to 12 full-time employees, 20 consultants, and the occasional intern. It is selling AngioDefender in India and is getting ready to penetrate the markets in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, United Kingdom, and Canada.

"We are now in go-to market mode," Charlton says.

Everist Health is also working to get the green light in the U.S. from the FDA. It is in the midst of organizing a clinical trial and hopes to get approval from the FDA by next year.

"We expect to start it very soon," Charlton says. "Certainly before the end of the year."

Everist Health's original plan was to use contract manufacturers in India to produce AngioDefender. It has since changed its course and is now using a Michigan-based manufacturer it found with the help of MichBio.

"As we ramp up we will be creating more work for not only us but other Michigan companies," Charlton says.

Source: Randal Charlton, director of Everist Health
Writer: Jon Zemke

Rubicon Genomics hires 6, moves to bigger Ann Arbor space

Rubicon Genomics was hiring people left and right until it literally ran out of space to put the new employees earlier this year. That’s changing now that the life sciences firm moved last June.

"At that point we were in a hiring freeze because we didn't have the room," says Christine Haakenson, COO of Rubicon Genomics. "Now that we have a new facility we can hire again."

Rubicon Genomics moved to a 19,000-square-foot space on Venture Dr, which is nearly double the size of its previous home. That is more than enough space for its 26 employees and two interns. The company has hired six people over the last year and is in the process of hiring two more right now. Two more job openings are set to come up within the next few weeks. Haakenson expects the company to make 15 more hires by the end of the next year.

The 14-year-old company makes genomic library preparation kits for research and clinical applications. Its patented technology specializes in sample-specific nucleic acid library preparation products used in research and clinical testing. The firm got its start when a pair of University of Michigan professors found a way to bring human genetics laboratory knowledge to everyday medical applications. These molecular biology tools help facilitate gene-based research, drug development and diagnostics.

Sales of Rubicon Genomics's products are up 40 percent over the last year. The firm's sales have spiked in China and Europe, prompting it to make plans to expand into India, Mexico and Brazil.

"The whole market is growing and sales of our technology are growing," Haakenson says. "We are launching new products in the field."

Source: Christine Haakenson, COO of Rubicon Genomics
Writer: Jon Zemke

U-M in top 10% of Forbes Top Colleges ranking

In this twist on typical college ranking methodologies, Forbes looks at what students take away from college vs. what it takes to get in.

Excerpt:

"The FORBES 7th annual Top Colleges ranking reveals higher education in flux, ongoing debate between the value of liberal arts vs. STEM degrees and a winning formula of high student satisfaction and graduation rates, alumni career success and low student debt...

What sets our calculation of 650 colleges and universities apart from other rankings is our firm belief in "output" over "input." We’re not all that interested in what gets a student  into  college. Our sights are set directly on ROI: What are students getting  out  of college."

More here

 

Cosmo Branding and Marketing launches out of Pony Ride

Sabra Morman and Catherine Watson launched Cosmo Branding and Marketing last fall to provide services to small businesses starting up in Detroit.

Today, the Corktown-based company -- it calls Pony Ride home -- has established itself as a firm that helps startups and entrepreneurs tell their stories.

"We saw the need was there for branding for startups, especially in downtown Detroit," Watson says.

Both Morman and Watson have backgrounds in creative and entrepreneurial ventures. They have been able to help their clients with everything from product designs to guerilla marketing to event planning. The whole idea is to help businesses build better brands by executing well-thought-out marketing strategies. Among its clients are Caledonia Capital Partners and Infinite Mile.

"We like to work with a variety of different businesses," Morman says. "It allows us to diversify and sharpen our skills."

Cosmo Branding and Marketing currently is composed of Watson and Morman, two independent contractors, and an intern. The team is now looking to take on clients outside of Michigan during its second year.

Source: Sabra Morman and Catherine Watson, co-founders of Cosmo Branding and Marketing
Writer: Jon Zemke

Clarkston State Bank grows off increased commercial lending

The financial crisis wasn't a crisis for everyone. For Clarkston State Bank it was an opportunity.

The Clarkston-based bank filled in the vacuum of commercial lending in recent years while larger banks ran scared from the sector. That has allowed the local bank to grow its bottom line and a few other things.

"We've been a very active lender, specifically commercial lending," says Grant Smith, president & CEO of Clarkston State Bank. "It's why we have been hiring a few people this year."

The 15-year-old community bank has hired three people over the last year, including a vice president of credit administration and a treasurer. It now employs a staff of 44 people among four branches in Clarkston, Waterford, and Independence Township. It is currently building a replacement branch near McLaren Hospital.

Clarkston State Bank has watched its revenue grow by 20-30 percent for each of the last few years. Its net income is up 20 percent while retail deposits are up $15 million. The bank also booked $30 million in new lending last year while it reviewed nearly $60 million in deals during that time. It hopes to add a few million more in lending this year.

"That's quite a bit for a small bank," Smith says.

Source: Grant Smith, president & CEO of Clarkston State Bank
Writer: Jon Zemke
2754 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts