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TrynEx expands staff with 12 hires in Madison Heights

TrynEx has some humble beginnings. The Madison Heights-based firm got its start in 1977 as a lawn care and snow removal company. It evolved into making lawn care and snow removal equipment in the mid 1990s before it was acquired by Douglas Dynamics last year.

That acquisition doesn’t mean the company stopped investing in Michigan. Since becoming a division of Douglas Dynamics the company has hired staff and improved its facility in Madison Heights.

"The strength of a bigger company helps," says Barry Traun, vice president of marketing & development for TrynEx. "We have more bench strength and ability."

TrynEx has a number of brands in the snow removal (SnowEx), landscaping (TrufEx), and janitorial (SweepEx) equipment areas. It has hired a dozen people over the last year for engineering and production positions, expanding its staff to just more than 50 employees and a couple of interns. It is also looking to hire a salesperson.

TrynEx has also invested in improving its facility in Madison Heights. It turned one of its spare spaces into more work space for its growing staff and a new training center.

"That's where we’re hosting the Salt Summit event next week," Traun says.

The company’s revenue has been propelled by the release of new products and the harsh winter the country just went through. This year is also looking up.

"2013 to 2014 has seen pretty substantial growth as well," Traun says.

Source: Barry Traun, vice president of marketing & development for TrynEx
Writer: Jon Zemke

Qstride continues to hire, grow in downtown Detroit

Qstride at an interesting point on its growth curve. The tech company is successful, landing large customers and spiking its revenue; however, the company doesn’t have the resources it needs to scale itself.

Qstride, which has offices in Troy and downtown Detroit, has grown its revenue by 130 percent over the last year. It now clocks sales in excess of $2 million -- something it has achieved entirely through bootstrapping.

"We have a model that is proven," says Shane Gianino, founder & CEO of Qstride. "Of course, it's a marathon, not a sprint."

The 2.5-year-old firm specializes in business intelligence and analytics services that integrate with its customer's IT systems. It also provided staffing services for the technology sector. It currently employs 20-odd people, half of whom work in downtown Detroit.

"We're looking at potentially expanding our presence downtown," Gianino says. "We're trying to figure that out."

Qstride has hired three people three people in downtown Detroit and Gianino is optimistic that the number can grow quickly over the next year as he begins to entertain offers for venture capital investment in the company to help scale it.

"We have an opportunity to add a lot of jobs in Detroit," Gianino says.

Source: Shane Gianino, founder & CEO of Qstride
Writer: Jon Zemke

RBD Creative moves to larger office in Plymouth

For RBD Creative’s first seven years, it called the carriage house of one of Detroit's oldest structures home. Today the company has matured to a traditional office in a new home in the suburbs.

The marketing company made the move to Plymouth in March. The new home puts it closer to core clients, such as the University of Michigan and Genesis Genetics, which is also based in Plymouth.

"That's part of the reason we moved to Plymouth," says Dorothy Twinney, president & owner of RBD Creative.

Also necessitating the move is RBD Creative's growth making it into a different and bigger company. When it launched it had three people. Today it has a staff of a dozen employees and the occasional intern after making two hires over the last year. The new office in Plymouth is much bigger, measuring out to 2,000 square feet. It also has a conference room.

"Now we have a much bigger conference area," Twinney says.

RBD Creative is looking to add more clients in the food and academic sectors both this year and next.

"For whatever reason these two areas seem to be our thing," Twinney says.

Source: Dorothy Twinney, president & owner of RBD Creative
Writer: Jon Zemke

Detroit Bikes expands staff as bike sales gain traction

People started to have their doubts about Detroit Bikes last year when the bicycle startup issued temporary layoffs at its production facility only a few months after starting to sell its first bikes.

Those doubts are gone this summer. The two-year-old company called back most of those workers this spring and is hiring new people this summer after debuting its second version of a classic, American-style bicycle.

"Sales are really strong," says Zak Pashak, founder & president of Detroit Bikes. "It's not exactly what I predicted, but we’re back-ordered right now. It's a good position to be in."

Pashak moved to Detroit from Calgary with the idea of building a simple, streamlined bicycle for riding in urban environments in the heart of America's manufacturing mecca. The result was the A-Type, a bicycle with thinner/smoother tires on larger wheels, a frame made of chromoly steel, and only three speeds. The idea: keep it simple.

So far that idea is working. Detroit Bikes has sold nearly 1,000 of the A-Type model, prompting it to release the B-Type last week. The B-Type features a step-through frame that's easier to mount and dismount. It also has a glossy white finish (the A-Type only came in black, a la Henry Ford's Model T). "We use a powdered coat, which is more environmentally friendly," Pashak says.

It's all part of Pashak's plan to start with a good product and harness some word of mouth buzz to drive sales. That materialized slower than Pashak expected, but Detroit Bikes has come out with a better marketing plan and expanded its distribution network across the continent.

"I think we have a shop in every state now," Pashak says.

And they are accepting product from Detroit Bikes’ 50,000-square-foot facility on Elmira Street near Schaefer Highway on the city's far west side. The company now employs 10 people at the facility and is looking to hire four more. Pashak expects to sell between 3,000 and 4,000 bikes by year’s end and 10,000 by the end of next year. He is also looking to add some international sales to the mix later this year.

"I want to sell bikes to anybody who will buy them," Pashak says. "I also like the idea of exporting them. Anything we can do to bring more money into the local economy."

Source: Zak Pashak, founder & president of Detroit Bikes
Writer: Jon Zemke

Midtown Concierge opens pilot site in Henry Ford Hospital

Balance Concierge expanded into Detroit with the opening of Midtown Concierge earlier this month.

The East Lansing-based firm specializes in providing concierge services at hospitals. It launched a pilot location in Henry Ford Hospital in New Center called Midtown Concierge. The year-long pilot will offer free concierge services to Henry Ford Health System employees, helping them strike a better work-life balance by taking care of everyday tasks, such as oil changes and getting tickets to events.

Midtown Concierge is staffed by two people and is only available to hospital employees during the pilot phase.

"It has the potential to serve clients outside of the hospital after the pilot phase," says Jennifer Cooper, vice president of marketing & new programs for Balance Concierge.

Balance Concierge came to Detroit on the invitation of Henry Ford Health System. The move was facilitated by Midtown Detroit.

"They were a key player in setting this up," Cooper says.

Source: Jennifer Cooper, vice president of marketing & new programs for Balance Concierge
Writer: Jon Zemke

Incite Informatics adds 5 jobs as revenue spikes

Culture isn't just a catchphrase for Incite Informatics. It's something worth hiring people for.

The Farmington-based company, formerly Performant Systems Group, has all the requisites for a new tech firm, like an office full of smart young people working in comfortable jobs and periodically playing ping pong to boost productivity. It even hired a culture curator to help sharpen the company’s culture.

"Culture has always been important to us," says Matt Griffin, president & CEO of Incite Informatics. "We have always hired young people. People who have different expectations about what the workplace looks like and acts like."

Griffin and Craig Jackson launched the company four years ago, specializing in business analysis, analytics tools, data management and data visualization. They rebranded it earlier this month to better reflect the company's ability to organize, visualize, and mobilize their clients' data, giving them better visibility into operations so they can make better decisions.

"We grew up building solutions for large companies like KFC and Ingersoll-Rand," Griffin says. "But we're also working with a number of small companies."

Incite Informatics opened a new office in Seattle earlier this year. It has hired five people over the last year and is looking to bring on another three. It currently has a staff 21 employees and two interns. Its revenue spiked over the last year, going from $1.8 million to $4.8 million.

"It's a healthy jump," Griffin says. "I don't know how sustainable it is year to year but we're definitely in growth mode."

Source: Matt Griffin, president & CEO of Incite Informatics
Writer: Jon Zemke

U-M in top 10% of Forbes Top Colleges ranking

In this twist on typical college ranking methodologies, Forbes looks at what students take away from college vs. what it takes to get in.

Excerpt:

"The FORBES 7th annual Top Colleges ranking reveals higher education in flux, ongoing debate between the value of liberal arts vs. STEM degrees and a winning formula of high student satisfaction and graduation rates, alumni career success and low student debt...

What sets our calculation of 650 colleges and universities apart from other rankings is our firm belief in "output" over "input." We’re not all that interested in what gets a student  into  college. Our sights are set directly on ROI: What are students getting  out  of college."

More here

 

Rubicon Genomics hires 6, moves to bigger Ann Arbor space

Rubicon Genomics was hiring people left and right until it literally ran out of space to put the new employees earlier this year. That’s changing now that the life sciences firm moved last June.

"At that point we were in a hiring freeze because we didn't have the room," says Christine Haakenson, COO of Rubicon Genomics. "Now that we have a new facility we can hire again."

Rubicon Genomics moved to a 19,000-square-foot space on Venture Dr, which is nearly double the size of its previous home. That is more than enough space for its 26 employees and two interns. The company has hired six people over the last year and is in the process of hiring two more right now. Two more job openings are set to come up within the next few weeks. Haakenson expects the company to make 15 more hires by the end of the next year.

The 14-year-old company makes genomic library preparation kits for research and clinical applications. Its patented technology specializes in sample-specific nucleic acid library preparation products used in research and clinical testing. The firm got its start when a pair of University of Michigan professors found a way to bring human genetics laboratory knowledge to everyday medical applications. These molecular biology tools help facilitate gene-based research, drug development and diagnostics.

Sales of Rubicon Genomics's products are up 40 percent over the last year. The firm's sales have spiked in China and Europe, prompting it to make plans to expand into India, Mexico and Brazil.

"The whole market is growing and sales of our technology are growing," Haakenson says. "We are launching new products in the field."

Source: Christine Haakenson, COO of Rubicon Genomics
Writer: Jon Zemke

U-M's struggle to adopt data-driven learning

Transitioning from traditional educational methods to our technology-aided, data-driven culture is a much more complicated and unwieldy than you might think.

Excerpt:

"But things were beginning to change. That same year, Michigan created a central data warehouse that has become a giant digital filing cabinet for all of the data collected by the university’s 19 schools and colleges. And soon universitywide management software vastly increased the amount of data flowing into that central warehouse.

More recently, Michigan has piped in data from its learning-management system that not only identify students and the courses they are taking, but also indicate how frequently they log in to the system, download digital course materials, and submit online assignments."

Read the rest here.

Dynamic Edge adds 11 new IT hires in Ann Arbor

Dynamic Edge growth has spiked over the last year. The Ann Arbor-based IT firm's revenue is up about 35 percent and it has hired 11 new people over the last 12 months, expanding the company’s staff to 49 employees and one intern.

Prompting that growth is the popularity of its Fixed IT program, which helps head off IT problems before they crash the system or even before they begin. Dynamic Edge has attracted a number of new customers, particularly in the healthcare sector.

"We see a number of opportunities coming from regulatory pressure and new HIPPA laws," says Bruce McCully, CEO of Dynamic Edge. "People are thinking twice about running that in-house."

Accounting firms are also flocking to Dynamic Edge's Fixed IT program. The regulatory pressure isn't as intense in that industry. In fact, McCully is not exactly sure what is driving CPAs to use his company’s platform.

"I'm not really sure why," McCully says. "It might be because the software they use is becoming more and more complicated."

Dynamic Edge has been on a growth streak like this for the last few years, but McCully wants to throttle back on some of that expansion this year and next. He would like to put more focus on refining the basics of Dynamic Edge’s business plan and execution of it.

"This year our theme has been sharpening the edge," McCully says. "We have put a lot of resources into improving delivery of our services to our customers."

Source: Bruce McCully, CEO of Dynamic Edge
Writer: Jon Zemke

Troy-based Seco Tools hires 20 for tech engineering group

Seco Tools is on a bit of a hiring spree as it works to fill out a new custom manufacturing space in Troy.

The Troy-based company specializes in metalcutting work in manufacturing. It recently consolidated an out-of-state facility with a new location in Troy that specializes in specialty manufacturing and testing. The firm has been staffing up the facility for the last year, making 20 hires in its technical engineering group.

"It's really just a skeleton crew. We need to add two more people to bring us up to where we need to be here," says Bob Goulding, tech engineering manager for Seco Tools. "We hope to add another shift next year."

The 35,000-square-foot space near the Automation Alley offices is the result of the company moving some work from a former location in Tennessee last fall. The new facility will do custom manufacturing and testing work when it’s all done.

"We're really just finishing it now," Goulding says.

Source: Bob Goulding, tech engineering manager for Seco Tools
Writer: Jon Zemke

Detroit Barre brings ballet barre fitness studio to riverfront

Ballet barre classes have made their way to Detroit with the opening of Detroit Barre on the Motor City’s East Riverfront neighborhood.

The 1-month-old fitness studio opened in a refurbished carriage house at 2217 Franklin St. near Chene Park, Atwater Brewery, and the Dequindre Cut. The space is 1,500 square feet, half of which is a dedicated workout area. Three instructors teach barre fitness, which is designed to work out the muscles of a dancer with low impact, isometric exercises that combine ideas from ballet, pilates, and yoga.

"It's accessible to people of all ages and ability levels," says Laura Davis, a teacher at Detroit Barre. "It provides a space where people of all walks of life can come together and improve their fitness level."

Detroit Barre currently welcomes a couple dozen regulars to its class. Davis and her partners would like to grow that clientele over the next year as they establish the business.

"We'd like to have a regular 50 students come in on a weekly basis," Davis says.

Source: Laura Davis, teacher at Detroit Barre
Writer: Jon Zemke

Clarkston State Bank grows off increased commercial lending

The financial crisis wasn't a crisis for everyone. For Clarkston State Bank it was an opportunity.

The Clarkston-based bank filled in the vacuum of commercial lending in recent years while larger banks ran scared from the sector. That has allowed the local bank to grow its bottom line and a few other things.

"We've been a very active lender, specifically commercial lending," says Grant Smith, president & CEO of Clarkston State Bank. "It's why we have been hiring a few people this year."

The 15-year-old community bank has hired three people over the last year, including a vice president of credit administration and a treasurer. It now employs a staff of 44 people among four branches in Clarkston, Waterford, and Independence Township. It is currently building a replacement branch near McLaren Hospital.

Clarkston State Bank has watched its revenue grow by 20-30 percent for each of the last few years. Its net income is up 20 percent while retail deposits are up $15 million. The bank also booked $30 million in new lending last year while it reviewed nearly $60 million in deals during that time. It hopes to add a few million more in lending this year.

"That's quite a bit for a small bank," Smith says.

Source: Grant Smith, president & CEO of Clarkston State Bank
Writer: Jon Zemke

300 Decisions fills out Ann Arbor office with new employees

Last year 300 Decision spent a lot of its time opening up a new office in Chicago. This year the Ann Arbor-based relocation-service firm has spent most of its time filling out its two offices.

"We have stayed about as busy as you can be at those two locations," Helen Dennis, president of 300 Decisions.

The 2-year-old company has hired three people (project managers) over the last year. It now employs a staff of seven people, which serves the likes of Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan, Rossetti (an architecture firm), the city of Chicago, Chicago Public Schools, and U.S. Cellular

"We are really busy and having a lot of fun helping our clients make difficult transitions," Dennis says.

That includes everything from internal communications at the client business to streamline the move to helping facilitate change management for the move. Dennis named the business 300 Decisions as a reference to her guesstimate of how many questions a company must ask itself when executing an office move.

This is Dennis's second relocation services business. Her first was acquired in 2006. This time she is taking a more measured approach to growth.

"I want to grow within reason," Dennis says. "By reason I mean growth that makes sense. I also want to stay involved in the culture of the company."

Source: Helen Dennis, president of 300 Decisions
Writer: Jon Zemke

Global LT lands private equity investment, adds 15 jobs

Global LT is making a big change as it positions itself to grow exponentially over the next few years.

The Troy-based firm specializes in language services, cultural training, expatriate destination services, and workforce training courses for international locales. It recently accepted a significant investment from Growth Equity Fund, an affiliate of the private-equity firm Vicente Capital Partners.

Hortensia Albertini started the company from her kitchen table in Metro Detroit in 1979. Albertini built Global LT into a multi-million-dollar company and eventually handed over control to her daughter, Lisette Poletes, who worked out the deal with Growth Equity Fund.

"It was a necessary step to in our path to get capital resources and technology to help us scale," says Tom Hanson, president of Global LT.

Between 2010 and 2013, Global LT clocked a 31-percent compound growth rate. It is aiming to grow 15 percent annually for the next few years. To accomplish that, Global LT's leadership is looking to expand its work with its existing customer base, land more contracts with the U.S. Dept of Defense, and penetrate the Asia-Pacific markets.

To do that, Global LT has hired 15 people over the last year, creating jobs in sales, operations, recruiters, and project managers. It’s also looking to add another six people to its existing staff of 103 employees, an intern, and several thousand independent contractors.

Source: Tom Hanson, president of Global LT
Writer: Jon Zemke
2868 Articles | Page: | Show All
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