| Follow Us: Facebook Twitter

News

2984 Articles | Page: | Show All

Simons Michelson Zieve moves into dynamic new space

Simons Michelson Zieve's new home is light years away from its old space in regards to openness and feel. Its old and new homes are also just a few blocks away from each other in Troy.

The 85-year-old advertising agency just moved into its new office at 1200 Kirts Boulevard, which measures out to 12,000 square feet. The space is actually a little smaller than its previous office but it doesn’t feel that way, with wraparound windows bringing in more natural light and multiple floor-to-ceiling, glass-walled meeting spaces.

"It just feels bigger," says Jamie Michelson, president of Simons Michelson Zieve.

The new office is much more open, conforming to the modern creative class demands of connecting people by breaking them out of the physical office silos. Michelson's team worked in several individual offices at the old office but wanted a more collegial atmosphere in its new one.

"People would say you have all of these wonderful people here but I can't see them," Michelson says.

Simons Michelson Zieve has a staff of 47 employees and a couple of interns. It has hired three people over the last year and is looking to hire another three right now. The open jobs include junior-level account coordinators. More info on the openings here

Source: Jamie Michelson, president of Simons Michelson Zieve
Writer: Jon Zemke

Farmington Hills-based ReapSo launches 2.0 version of app

Mobile startup ReapSo is launching the 2.0 version of its brand-advocacy app this fall.

The Farmington Hills-based company’s platform connects fans with the brands. It encourages its users to "WIN. VOTE. SAVE." so they can win prizes, voice their opinion and save money. Check out a video on it here.

The new version is focused on making those connections on broadcast mediums.

"We have expanded the 2.0 version to go after TV and radio channels with enhanced digital strategies," says Bill Wildern, co-founder & CEO of ReapSo. He adds, "You can get audience pulse with immediate feedback. They can send that out via social media."

ReapSo has grown its staff to seven employees. It is focusing on establishing the 2.0 version of its app across the U.S. this year and next.

"We want to grow the value proposition," Wildern says.

Source: Bill Wildern, co-founder & CEO of ReapSo
Writer: Jon Zemke

Zingerman's co-founder weighs in on minimum wage

Paul Saginaw, co-founder and partner at Zingerman's blogs about his company's commitment to a thriveable wage for its employees.

Excerpt:

"I hear many in the restaurant industry say raising menu prices will result in customer loss and diminished profits, but I reject that and question the scale of those profit margins, wondering if the margins are maintained by shorting their employees. Customers have voted with their pocketbooks for locally sourced, organic, and free-range products. Now is a prime time to educate “voters” for ethical employment practices as well.

Many myths about the industry workforce and the minimum wage create a false reality and highly unproductive debate. The truth is that livable wages and profits are not mutually exclusive, and Zingerman’s are not the only businesses to know this and operate accordingly. RAISE, an alternative restaurant association, is aligning businesses across the nation to adopt “high road” labor practices. Zingerman’s Community of Businesses joined. I sense that there is public readiness to join this growing business leadership and leverage its consumer dollars to “vote” for raising standards for workers."

Read the rest here.
 

TechTown’s AiirShare brings sharing economy to private planes

The sharing economy has made its way into most facets of everyday people's lives. Today, it's not uncommon to rent out your car for cab rides or a spare room for hotel stays. A TechTown-based startup now wants to take that concept airborne.

AiirShare brings sharing economy to aircraft and flying, helping people with private planes rent out empty seats to fliers. Those seats can range from single-engine Cessnas to private jets.

"I always loved aviation and always wanted something to do with it," says Joe Tuchman, co-founder & CEO of AiirShare.

Tuchman participated in TechTown’s DTX Launch program last summer. He said it gave him a lot of basic tools to get his startup off the ground, such as identifying customers and networking with other resources.

"That was a huge help," Tuchman says.

AiirShar's team of two people currently is working with a few dozens pilots flying out of Michigan. The flights go to nearby places, such as Indiana and Chicago. Tuchman hopes to reach further over the next year.

"I want to completely saturate Michigan with flights to Chicago and Indiana," Tuchman says.

Source: Joe Tuchman, co-founder & CEO of AiirShare
Writer: Jon Zemke

DC3‘s Creative Ventures looks for a few good service firms

The Detroit Creative Corridor Center (DC3) is looking for a few young creative service firms for the latest cohort of fellows in its Creative Ventures Residency program.

The New Center-based organization specializes in helping grow the creative economy in Detroit, specifically in the Woodward corridor between downtown and New Center. This fall, the Creative Ventures Residency invites creative service firms (e.g. interior design and graphic design companies) to apply for the mentorship program.

"We felt we had the most to offer to design service providers," says Ellie Schneider, associate director of the Detroit Creative Corridor Center.

The Creative Ventures Residency has been helping creative firms grow into stable companies that create jobs in the greater downtown Detroit area. It has incubated 45 early stage creative startups, creating 89 jobs and generating $2.1 million in revenues.

The Detroit Creative Corridor Center has reformed the program a little, shrinking its total length from 12 months to six months. It is also focusing on service-providing firms instead of startups. It is also looking for firms that are just beginning to establish themselves and want to move to the organization’s headquarters in New Center.

"We think they benefit much more from being based in our offices," Schneider says.

For information on applying, click here.

Source: Ellie Schneider, associate director of the Detroit Creative Corridor Center
Writer: Jon Zemke

Renovo Power Technology expands product lineup, staff

Renovo Power Technology has a growing staff to go with its expanding product portfolio in alternative energy.

The downtown Ann Arbor-based company has doubled it staff with three hires in sales, marketing and government affairs. That employment growth is thanks to more sales from a wider variety of products.

Renovo Power Technology makes advanced inverters that help transition energy from solar panels to the electric grid. The transformerless inverter technology gets rid of the copper coils of traditional transformers and replaces them with electronics that are both more efficient and cheaper to manufacture. Normal five kilowatt inverters weigh 150 pounds. Renovo Power Technology's inverters are less than 60 pounds.

It recently launched a micro inverter that allows an inverter/solar panel ratio to be as low as 1/1. Often an inverter will service an array of solar panels that can number a dozen or more.

"It offers more flexibility when it comes to installations where shading might come into effect," says Shane LaHouse, managing partner of Renovo Power Technology. "It also allows for smaller installations."

Renovo Power Technology currently has its technology being used in two large installments in Michigan with a third being lined up in Traverse City. It also looking to use its technology in a 166-panel array on 416 W Huron in Ann Arbor next year. The company is also looking to land more orders from governments, such as municipalities, in 2015.

"Our primary focus is on the Midwest," LaHouse says.

Source: Shane LaHouse, managing partner of Renovo Power Technology
Writer: Jon Zemke

Seelio adds 14 people to downtown Ann Arbor office

Startups launched and grown in Ann Arbor can sometimes end up in new homes after they are acquired. That’s not the case with Seelio. The 3-year-old startup is doubling down on Tree Town with a small spike in hiring.

The downtown Ann Arbor-based higher education software startup has hired 14 people over the last year, expanding its staff to 22 employees and an intern. It is currently looking to hire four more people in software development, educational services, and a director of a university partnership development. Check out the openings here.

"We have been hiring at a rapid pace," says Emily Keller-Logan, director of marketing & communications for Seelio. "We have brought on a lot of talented people."

Seelio's platform enables college students to showcase their portfolio of work. The software documents how their college projects came to fruition and presents them for employers in job interviews. Check out a video about the platform here.

"We're providing student lifecycle portfolios to institutions so that students can begin preparing for their careers from orientation to graduation," Keller-Logan says.

Seelio raised a $1.5 million seed capital round in 2013. It was acquired by Kansas City-based PlattForm last summer.

Source: Emily Keller-Logan, director of marketing & communications for Seelio
Writer: Jon Zemke

Underground Printing leverages revenue spike for 52 hires

Underground Printing spent most of the last year building up the business infrastructure it had laid the groundwork for in previous years, and is starting to reap some significant rewards.

The Ann Arbor-based clothing printer is projecting that it will hit $16 million in revenues this year. That's up from $13.8 million last year, a jump of nearly 15 percent. As a result Underground Printing has hired 52 people in a wide variety of positions. It now has a staff of 190 people with 133 based in Ann Arbor.

"It (the new hires) are across the board," says Rishi Narayan, co-owner of Underground Printing. "The new employees are all over the company."

The 13-year-old company makes custom printed apparel, like t-shirts and embroidered clothing. It has 19 stores across North America, including four in Ann Arbor. It production facility is also in Ann Arbor.

Underground Printing opened a handful of new stores a few years ago. Since then it has focused on building up sales for those locations, along with its production capabilities. The firm has added two automatic presses and other parts of screen prep equipment.

"Our improvements have been focused on the backend," Narayan says.

Source: Rishi Narayan, co-owner of Underground Printing
Writer: Jon Zemke

Guidesmob grows as its app introducing students to college towns takes off

Guidesmob, a startup product from Bizdom, is gearing up to release the second generation of its higher-education guide app, and it's looking to take over the Big Ten with it.

The downtown Detroit-based firm’s mobile app helps students discover and learn more about their new college towns. Daniel Kerbel, CEO of Guidesmob, started working on the app after going to Michigan State University as an international student from Costa Rica.

Guidesmob launched the Spartan App for Michigan State University in 2012. It has been downloaded 27,000 times since. The company is now looking to release a new version of that app for Michigan State University, along with Central Michigan University and the University of Michigan later this year.

"We're getting ready to launch a new platform," Kerbel says "Basically a Spartan App 2.0."

Kerbel and his two co-founders went to Michigan State and Central Michigan universities. They choose to focus on those schools (and U-M) because of the number of connections they have built there over the years and because many of those students co-mingle. It’s a big reason why Guidesmob is going to target Big Ten and MAC schools for expansion first.

"The approach is to take over conferences of universities," Kerbel says.

Guidesmob is in the process of hiring two people right now. It's also working to raise a seed capital round to finance its expansion and to build out its team. The company hopes to raise a Series A of $750,000 to $1 million by next spring.

Source: Daniel Kerbel, CEO of Guidesmob
Writer: Jon Zemke

GreenPath credit-counseling organization hires 55 in Michigan

GreenPath is expanding by opening up new credit-counseling offices across the U.S.

The Farmington Hills-based non-profit has opened five offices over the last year, including new offices in Escanaba and Canton. It now has 60 offices across 12 states.

"Our primary growth has been opening up the new offices," says Kurt Murphy, CFO of GreenPath.

The 53-year-old non-profit has been helping people regain control of their finances through counseling and strategic planning. That means helping clients avoid foreclosure or repairing their credit scores.

GreenPath has grown to the point where it employs 470 people. A majority of them are based in Michigan (385) with 310 employees at the organization’s Farmington Hills headquarters. It has hired 65 people over the last year, including 55 in Michigan. Those jobs ranged from IT professionals to customer service reps.

GreenPath's revenue growth has been flat over the last year. Murphy attributes that to the growing economy and how hard American consumers were hit at the last recession.

"People got hit pretty hard," Murphy says. "It makes you a bit more careful before you pull that credit card out."

Source: Kurt Murphy, CFO of GreenPath
Writer: Jon Zemke

Molecular Imaging adds staff, opens San Diego office

Molecular is growing its business in a couple of different ways.

The Ann Arbor-based tech firm has opened a new office in San Diego and made a number of hires over the last year, adding five people in Ann Arbor over the last year, including a couple of PhD scientists and experts in oncology.

"We have done quite a bit hiring," says Patrick McConville, CSO & senior vice president at Molecular Imaging. "We have filled a few key positions."

Molecular Imaging provides in vivo pre-clinical imaging services for pharmaceutical, biotechnology and medical device companies. A group of venture capital firms, led by Farmington Hills-based Beringea, acquired the tech firm three years ago. Molecular Imaging opened a satellite office in San Diego in January. It hired two people for that office.

"There is a very big pharmaceutical and biotechnology community on the west coast, particularly in San Diego," McConville says. "We thought proximity would be important."

McConville notes that Molecular Imaging has experienced solid growth over the last year. He adds that is has doubled in size over the last three years and plans to maintain that growth curve.

"Now we're targeting the next doubling," McConville says.

Source: Patrick McConville, CSO & senior vice president at Molecular Imaging
Writer: Jon Zemke

ISSYS wins patent for sensor tech in Ypsilanti, adding positions

Integrated Sensing Systems, AKA ISSYS, recently received a patent for one of its minimally-invasive procedures used to insert its sensing technology,

The Ypsilanti-based tech firm designs and develops microelectromechanical systems for medical and scientific sensors. Its technology (miniature, wireless, batteryless, sensing implants) can be used in a variety of ways, such as wirelessly monitoring a heart or as fluid sensors in industrial manufacturing. The new patent is part of Integrated Sensing Systems’ sensor implementation as part of a minimally-invasive procedure, such as arthroscopic surgery.

"The patent covers how you do the actual implementation," says Nader Najafi, president & CEO of Integrated Sensing Systems.

The 19-year-old company has hired four people over the last year, including three engineers and an administrative person. It now has a staff of close to 30 people and is looking to hire another three people in engineering and quality control.

Integrated Sensing Systems has experienced incremental growth over the last year, but Najafi is optimistic that 2015 should bring double-digit revenue gains. He points out that Integrated Sensing Systems technology has received government approval for a few countries in Europe, which should clear the way for more sales.

"The potential for expansion has improved dramatically for 2015," Najafi says.

Source: Nader Najafi, president & CEO of Integrated Sensing Systems
Writer: Jon Zemke

Arborlight starts to sell new LED technology across U.S.

Arborlight is starting to go national this year, and has its sights set on some big milestones in 2015.

The Ann Arbor-based tech startup is starting to sell its sun-light-like LED lights across the country. It now has a backlog of orders amounting to $150,000 and is gearing up to start selling both a commercial and residential version soon.

"We have made tremendous strides,”"says Mike Forbis, CEO of Arborlight. "We have completed product development."

The 4-year-old company is creating a "daylight emulation system." Think of it as an energy-efficient LED light that can imitate sunlight down to the color, temperature, and other subtle details. The technology has an algorithm that is connected to a weather forecast, allowing the LED to behave in the same way as the outside lighting.

Arborlight has developed a commercial version that is 4 feet by 4 feet. It also recently came out with a 2 foot by 2 foot version that can be used in residences. The company has fielded orders from architects across the U.S.

"We have a fair amount of interest and traction," Forbis says.

Arborlight is in the process of raising a $1 million Series A after raising $500,000 in seed capital last year. Forbis hopes to close on the Series A before the end of the year. The company is currently made up of six employees and the occasional summer intern. It has hired three people over the last year, including marketing and sales professionals. Forbis expects his staff to reach eight people by next year.

Source: Mike Forbis, CEO of Arborlight
Writer: Jon Zemke

Veggie Pails delivers fresh veggies in Oakland County

Melissa Tabalno and Nicole Converse spent a lot of time in Alaska in recent years, working in the fishing industry.

The partners are back home in Metro Detroit now after getting their new business, Veggie Pails, off the ground. The Highland-based business delivers buckets (or pails) of fresh fruits, vegetables, and other locally produced foods to customers across Oakland County.

"This is a business to get us back on land," Tabalno says.

She and Converse turned Veggie Pails into their full-time jobs earlier this year. The company has now grown to the point where it is looking for its own commercial space to operate out of. Tabalno and Converse are specifically looking for a storefront/warehouse combo where they can build their core business and a retail presence.

In the meantime Veggie Pails is growing through word of mouth and on the strength of its pails full of nutritious food.

"Our pails are really pretty," Tabalno says, saying how the company is continuing to focus on the presentation of its product.

Source: Melissa Tabalno, co-owner of Veggie Pails
Writer: Jon Zemke

Midwestern Consulting continues growth spurt with four new jobs

The fact that residential and commercial development is on the rise is good news for a lot of folks, but perhaps few more than Midwestern Consulting, an engineering services firm. Though their staff dipped to 32 employees during the recession, that number has risen to 55 over the last 24 months, including four newly added positions. 

"The residential and commercial development is up about 40 percent of what it was last year," says Scott Betzoldt, a partner with Midwest Consulting. "These people we've added are directly involved in residential and commercial development."

Midwestern Consulting has provided engineering services such as civil, environmental and transportation engineering, as well as surveying, planning, information technology and landscape architecture to both private and public clients since 1967. The new positions include  a senior project manager, project engineer, project landscape architect, and engineering and ACAD Technician. Between them the four new employees have more than 60 years of experience in their fields — they don't represent the end of the Ann Arbor firm's growth. 

"We would like to increase our client base in Washtenaw County and Southeast Michigan and try to return to what we were before 2005 and 2006," says Betzoldt, referring to the company's pre-recession staff of 85, "and at that point, we'll then consider branching out into other parts of the state." 

Source: Scott Betzoldt, Midwestern Consulting
Writer: Natalie Burg
2984 Articles | Page: | Show All
Signup for Email Alerts